New research program hopes to shed light on climate change in Inuit Nunangat

Thirteen projects will receive funding as part of the Canada-Inuit Nunangat-United Kingdom Arctic Research Program.

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The Canada-Inuit Nunangat-United Kingdom (CINUK) Arctic Research Program includes 13 projects that will explore the environmental, social, economic, cultural, engineering and infrastructure impacts of climate change in Inuit Nunangat. (Nunatsiaq News file photo)

Researchers hope to learn more about how climate change impacts the Canadian Arctic through the launch of a new program.

Thirteen projects will use $18.2 million to explore how the phenomenon is causing environmental, social, economic, cultural, engineering and infrastructure challenges across Inuit Nunangat.

They are part of the Canada-Inuit Nunangat-United Kingdom (CINUK) Arctic Research Program and are funded by Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, United Kingdom Research and Innovation (UKRI), POLAR Knowledge Canada, the National Research Council of Canada (NRC), Parks Canada Agency, and Fonds de recherche du Québec.

One of those projects, called Carving out Climate Testimony: Inuit Youth, Wellness & Environmental Stewardship will see researchers at the University of Saskatchewan and the University of Newcastle work with youth in Tuktoyaktuk, Kuujjuaq, Makkovik and Rankin Inlet.

The project will look at a two-fold question: How does climate change impact Inuit youth and what are the resilience factors that enhance mental health and well-being?

Another project funded by the initiative aims to generate knowledge about the risks associated with climate change-induced growth in Arctic shipping across Inuit Nunangat.

With researchers from the University of Ottawa and the British Antarctic Survey, the Inuit Qaujisarnirmut Pilirijjutit on Arctic Shipping Risks in Inuit Nunangat project will identify and evaluate potential management strategies that support Inuit self-determined shipping and oceans governance.

The program is in place until 2025.